Jeanne Lanvin’s apartment in Paris

31/07/2011

via fashioned by love | Jeanne Lanvin apartment in Paris
Jeanne Lanvin’s apartment on 16 rue Barbet-de-Jouy decorated by Armand-Albert Rateau in the 1920s was a lavishly Art Deco styled heaven of femininity.

via fashioned by love | Jeanne Lanvin apartment in Paris
via fashioned by love | Jeanne Lanvin apartment in Paris
via fashioned by love | Jeanne Lanvin apartment in Paris
The strong cornflower blue colour of the silk-upholstered walls was inspired by the skies of a Fra Angelico fresco that Lanvin adored and was later referred to as “Lanvin Blue”. Another symbolic and very personal touch was a daisy motif that Rateau added to a hand embroidered border of white flowers and leaves.

via fashioned by love | Jeanne Lanvin apartment in Paris
The black and cream marble bathroom filled with hand-crafted details, from the carved sink, the mosaic floor, cast bronze hardware to the most stunning plaster decoration was a true example of Rateau’s passion for eclectic styles of Babylon, Pompeii and ancient Rome as well as his superior skills as a decorator.

via fashioned by love | Jeanne Lanvin apartment in Paris
via fashioned by love | Jeanne Lanvin apartment in Paris
via fashioned by love | Jeanne Lanvin apartment in Paris
Although the entire Jeanne Lanvin's home was taken down in 1965, the complete decoration and furniture of the boudoir, bedroom and bathroom was saved and given to the Musée des Arts Décoratifs by Prince Louis de Polignac where the rooms were lovingly reassembled in 1985 and opened for visitors.

Lanvin dresses in fashion editorials

30/07/2011

via fashioned by love | Lanvin Spring/Summer 2011
 For the love of Lanvin and fashion I’m dedicating this Saturday post to three stunners from the Spring 2011 collection.

via fashioned by love | Lanvin Spring/Summer 2011
via fashioned by love | Lanvin Spring/Summer 2011
via fashioned by love | Lanvin Spring/Summer 2011
via fashioned by love | Lanvin Spring/Summer 2011
via fashioned by love | Lanvin Spring/Summer 2011
via fashioned by love | L'Express Styles March 2011 (photography: Jean-Francois Campos, styling: Mika Mizutani
via fashioned by love | Chanel Iman in Elle UK February 2011 (photography: David Vasiljevic, styling: Anne-Marie Curtis)
via fashioned by love| Isabeli Fontana in Vogue Spain (photography: Greg Kadel, styling: Katie Mossman)
via fashioned by love | Linda Vojtova in Marie Claire US March 2011 (photography: Txema Yeste, styling: Alison Edmond)
via fashioned by love | Abbey Lee Kershaw in Numero #123 May 2011 (photography: Tom Munro)
Valeria Melnik in Vogue Hellas July 2011 (photography: Thanassis Krikis)
via fashioned by love | Harper's Bazaar UK April 2011
via fashioned by love | Nicole Hofman in Air France Madame April 2011 (photography: Nikos Popadopolous, styling: Virginie Dhello)
via fashioned by love | Rosanna Georgiou in Marie Claire Greece April 2011 (photography: George Katsanakis)
via fashioned by love | Rosanna Georgiou in Marie Claire Greece April 2011 (photography: George Katsanakis)
via fashioned by love | Cindy Crawford in Elle Bulgaria August 2011 (photography: Chen Man Zhang Jing)
via fashioned by love | Caroline Trentini in Elle France March 2011 (photography: Jean-Baptiste Mondino, styling: Friquette Thevenet, Tamara taichman & Anne-Marie Broulliet)
via fashioned by love | Saskia de Brauw in i-D March 2011 (photography: Kacper Kasprzyk, styling: Erika Kurihara)
via fashioned by love | Coco Rocha in ST Fashion March 2011 (photography: Alex Cayley, styling: Rolando Beauchamp)
via fashioned by love | Nuyou Singapore April 2011
via fashioned by love | Carola Remer in Self-Service March 2011 (photography: Daniel Jackson, styling: Marie Chaix)
via fashioned by love | Daria Werbowy in Vogue US April 2011 (photography: Mert & Marcus, styling: Tonne Goodman)
via fashioned by love | Raquel Zimmermann in Vogue Nippon March 2011 (photography: Inez & Vinoodh, styling: George Cortina)
via fashioned by love | Vogue Italia February 2011 (photography: Emma Summerton, styling: Edward Enninful)
via fashioned by love | Anja Rubik in Vogue Paris May 2011 (photography: Mikael Jansson, styling: Anastasia Barbieri)
via fashioned by love | Iselin Steiro & Kinga Rajzak in Lanvin Spring/Summer 2011 campaign (photography: Steven Meisel)
via fashioned by love | Helena Christensen in Harper's Bazaar Russia may 2011 (photography: Luis Sanchis, styling: Natalia Alaverdyan)
Nuyou Singapore April 2011
via fashioned by love | Daphne Groeneveld in Vogue Paris February 2011 (photography: Mario Sorrenti, styling: Carine Roitfeld)
via fashioned by love | Lara Stone in Vogue China May 2011 (photography: Inez & Vinood)
As Alber Elbaz said, some dresses are created for women and the others – for fashion editorials: these particular forget-me-nots seem to be stylists’ most favourite pieces.

Photo sources: Lanvin Spring/Summer 2011 runaway images via stylebistro.com, Sara Bloomqvist in  L'Express Styles March 2011 (photography: Jean-Francois Campos, styling: Mika Mizutani), Chanel Iman in Elle UK February 2011 (photography: David Vasiljevic, styling: Anne-Marie Curtis), Isabeli Fontana in Vogue Spain (photography: Greg Kadel, styling: Katie Mossman), Linda Vojtova in Marie Claire US March 2011 (photography: Txema Yeste, styling: Alison Edmond), Abbey Lee Kershaw in Numero #123 May 2011 (photography: Tom Munro), Valeria Melnik in Vogue Hellas July 2011 (photography: Thanassis Krikis), Harper's Bazaar UK April 2011, Nicole Hofman in Air France Madame April 2011 (photography: Nikos Popadopolous, styling: Virginie Dhello), Rosanna Georgiou in Marie Claire Greece April 2011 (photography: George Katsanakis), Cindy Crawford in Elle Bulgaria August 2011 (photography: Chen Man Zhang Jing), Caroline Trentini in Elle France March 2011 (photography: Jean-Baptiste Mondino, styling: Friquette Thevenet, Tamara taichman & Anne-Marie Broulliet), Saskia de Brauw in i-D March 2011 (photography: Kacper Kasprzyk, styling: Erika Kurihara), Nuyou Singapore April 2011, Coco Rocha in ST Fashion March 2011 (photography: Alex Cayley, styling: Rolando Beauchamp), Carola Remer in Self-Service March 2011 (photography: Daniel Jackson, styling: Marie Chaix), Daria Werbowy in Vogue US April 2011 (photography: Mert & Marcus, styling: Tonne Goodman), Raquel Zimmermann in Vogue Nippon March 2011 (photography: Inez & Vinoodh, styling: George Cortina), Vogue Italia February 2011 (photography: Emma Summerton, styling: Edward Enninful), Anja Rubik in Vogue Paris May 2011 (photography: Mikael Jansson, styling: Anastasia Barbieri), Iselin Steiro & Kinga Rajzak in Lanvin Spring/Summer 2011 campaign (photography: Steven Meisel), Helena Christensen in Harper's Bazaar Russia may 2011 (photography: Luis Sanchis, styling: Natalia Alaverdyan), Nuyou Singapore April 2011, Daphne Groeneveld in Vogue Paris February 2011 (photography: Mario Sorrenti, styling: Carine Roitfeld), Lara Stone in Vogue China May 2011 (photography: Inez & Vinood)

Jeanne Lanvin: the story

29/07/2011

Unlike Coco Chanel, Paul Poiret or Elsa Schiaparelli, Jeanne Lanvin was a very private person – she would rather stay on background than dissolve herself into the lights of fame and social glamour. Dressed in black, she was more keen on concentrating on her designs and communicating with fabrics rather than people.

She began working very early. 13-year old Jeanne was helping dressmakers with their orders. She used to run around Paris by foot instead of paying tickets fees and was nicknamed 'The Little Omnibus'.

At the age of 18 Lanvin finished her apprenticeship as a milliner with “Madame Felix” at 15 Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honore and set up her own atelier in an attic in Rue du Marche Saint-Honore. 

She had the passion, unique talent, energy, enormous potential, capital of one gold louis and a client.

Jeann also run some study courses and it was during one of them at the Longchamp race course when she met her future husband, the Italian aristocrat Emilio di Pietro. The marriage lasted for 8 years (they married in 1895 and divorced in 1903) and the best thing about it was the birth of their little daughter, Marie-Blanche, Comtesse de Polignac or simply Marguerite or “Ririte” as Lanvin lovingly nicknamed her.

Marguerite 1900s
Marguerite was the inspiration and driving force behind Lanvin’s designs. Jeanne Lanvin created the looks of eternal youth, so that her daughter was the most beautiful woman in the world. Designing dream outfits that her daughter could wear gave Lanvin a chance to relive her own life as she’d always dreamed of. The life she had to sacrifice to her work.

According to Louise de Vilmorin, an authority on society psychology Jeanne Lanvin “dazzled everyone with her work, but she did it for the sake of dazzling her daughter.”

Jeanne Lanvin, Marie Alix & Marguerite
While Jeanne Lanvin as a mother enjoyed taking care of her baby girl, the business woman in her saw the birth as an inspiration and opportunity for a new venture – a line of children’s clothes. What started as a few dresses, turned into the most gorgeous wardrobe ever worn by a child – simple but luxurious clothes, from dresses to coats to jackets, gloves and hats made with the most beautiful fabrics and embroidered by hand. 

The haute couture pieces that were wearable and allowed a child to move and breathe freely attracted a well-deserved attention and suddenly became all the rage among Parisiennes so much so that Lanvin had to add a children’s department to her already successful ladies’ one.

The line became the essence of Lanvin.

Lanvin Veilleur de Nuit silk dress 1924 | via fashioned by love
Veilleur de Nuit silk dress 1924
In 1909 Jeanne Lanvin joined the Syndicat de la Couture and continued working on her collections that remained highly popular and in demand through the war times.

In her book Elisabeth Barille wrote, “In 1918 she took over the whole building at 22 Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honore. It included two workrooms for semi-tailored clothes, two for tailored ones, one for lingerie, one for hats, one that was used as a design studio, and two that were given over to embroidery; the latter was a speciality which Lanvin, unlike other couturiers, did not entrust to outside workers.

Lanvin boutique, sketches, embroidery, fabric swatches & label | via fashioned by love
Lanvin boutique, sketches, embroidery, fabric swatches & label
Her office was more of a connoisseur's study than a dress designer's studio, full of thousands of treasures gleaned from around the world by someone with a sensitive, resourceful and enquiring mind. There were sculptures, books, jewels, as well as an astonishing collection of fabrics and clothes; among them Indian saris, Persian silks, mandarins' robes, Breton waistcoats, embroidered African tunics and Coptic embroideries. It was a priceless booty, meticulously labelled and catalogued with bibliophile's obsessive care; Lanvin even called it her fabric library. By giving it an air of mystery, she gave it a life of its own. She was like a bee, tasting everything in order to make her exceptionally delicious honey.”

via fashioned by love | Lanvin Arpege perfume
In 1927 she launched her first perfume, “Arpege”, inspired by Marguerite practising her scales on the piano. The fragrance created by Andre Fraysse contained beautiful flower notes of Bulgarian rose, jasmine from Grasse, honey suckle, bergamot, neroli, vanilla and lily-of-the valley. The bottle, spherical La Boule perfume flacon, was designed by Armand-Albert Rateau, a decorator introduced to Lanvin by Paul Poiret when she needed someone to decorate the interior of her home in the Rue Barbet-de-Jouy. Both, the designer and decorator, shared an enormous love for beauty, luxurious materials and classic forms, although Rateau could never fully share Lanvin’s love for eternal youth and lightness and preferred eclectic designs of Babylon, Knossos and Pompeii.

via fashioned by love | Lanvin Arpege perfume
Lanvin fashion empire was flourishing. In the times of Art Deco she insisted that “modern clothes need a certain romantic feel” and continued creating dresses with a timeless appeal.

“When you are constantly thinking about new designs everything you see is transformed and adapted to whatever is in hand. The process happens naturally and becomes an instinct, a truth, a necessity, another language”, she said.

She designed for women, but she also created stage clothes for no less than 17 shows in just one year.
Her clothes were about perfection. She chose the fabrics, then developed her own colour schemes and even built a dyeing works in 1923 to achieve the subtle inimitable shades she was after. She used pieces of mica, coral, minute shells, gold and silver threads, ribbons and raffia along side of pearls and sequins, so that the beading would match the fabric, the mood and the motif.

via fashioned by love | Lanvin embroidery of a daisy / marguerite
Her embroideries often included a daisy or heart representing Lanvin’s love for her daughter. There were also a knot, bay, ivy or olive leaf as well as art deco rose or rose petals.

Once she said: ”A design inevitably reflects the artistic motifs stored in one's memory, drawing on those which are the most alive, new and fertile all at the same time”.

via fashioned by love | Jeanne Lanvin Biography
Jeanne Lanvin died on 6 July 1946, aged 79 leaving us with a stunning collection of her works and invaluable lessons about freedom and a fresh approach when it comes to fashion and life.