Gianfranco Ferre jewellery

28/06/2012

Gianfranco Ferre Jewellery Campaign Fall/Winter 1994-1995 (photography: Tyen)
“Jewellery is one of the most important expressions, a flexible and versatile way of translating ideas and emotions into reality. Or bringing dreams to life.”
Gianfranco Ferre

Jewellery was Ferre’s first love, never ending passion, a hobby inspired by his fascination with precision, craftsmanship, forms and materials and a way to express his vision of beauty.

He began making jewellery while studying architecture: whenever he had some time to spear, he was found moulding and combining leather and metals into bracelets and belts, which Gianfranco would later give to friends as presents.

Gianfranco Ferre jewellery & accessories, 1969-1970
Ferre's future changed when his childhood friend Isa Bertolini introduced him to Rosy Biffi and Franco Limonta, the owners of Biffi, the most popular Milanese boutique. The couple then approached the young man with an offer to design a small collection of leather accessories. At first Ferre refused blaming it on the upcoming exams, but eventually accepted. 

A few weeks later Isa’s sister, Luciana Bertolini was spotted at a fancy party wearing a leather bracelet made by Ferre. The accessory caught attention of Anna Piaggi, an editor of Italian Vogue, who quickly sensed a new talent and immediately contacted Gianfranco asking if he would be able to design a few pieces for the upcoming New York photoshoot.

And so, from bijoux to jewellery, his journey as a designer has began. Ferre stopped working as an architect and completely devoted himself to the new project.

Gianfranco Ferre collections: Spring/Summer 1989 campaign by Herb Ritts, Spring/Summer 1993 ready-to-wear collection, Fall/Winter 1993-1994 ready-to-wear collection & Fall/Winter 1992-1993 ready-to-wear by Gian Paolo Barbieri
The more he learned and saw, the more elaborate his pieces became. Influenced by West and East, history and places, he would sculpt the jewellery from gilded metals, painted wood, clay, semi-precious stones, tulle and sequins assigning each creation with a symbol, an ornament of India, China, Japan or the Amazon forest.

Everything he designed was “linked to the “physicality” of human form”, focusing attention on the key points of the figure: a long neck, shoulders, wrists and waist. The pieces were placed strategically to construct the body, lengthen it, add a touch of sensuality with a tinkling of bracelets, a necklace that caressed the neck or a wide belt that would mark the movement of the hips.

Gianfranco Ferre jewellery campaigns & collections: Fall/Winter 1993 campaign by Tyen, Spring/Summer 1990 campaign by Gian Paolo Barbieri, Spring/Summer 1991 by Gian Paolo Barbieri, Spring/Summer 1993 by Tyen, Spring/Summer 1993 ready-to-wear, Spring/Summer 1993 campaign by Gian Paolo Barbieri
He saw jewellery as a mirror of the clothing, one impossible without the other, but at the same time, as individual as a woman who wore it. In its most opulent form, the cascades of precious stones and beads laid over a bare flesh would replace a part of an outfit, becoming an item of clothing – it was a beautiful extreme, a totally new vision.

Photo source: Gianfranco Ferre Jewellery Campaign Fall/Winter 1994-1995 (photography: Tyen), Gianfranco Ferre jewellery & accessories, 1969-1970 , Gianfranco Ferre collections: Spring/Summer 1989 campaign by Herb Ritts, Spring/Summer 1993 ready-to-wear collection, Fall/Winter 1993-1994 ready-to-wear collection & Fall/Winter 1992-1993 ready-to-wear by Gian Paolo Barbieri, Gianfranco Ferre jewellery campaigns & collections: Fall/Winter 1993 campaign by Tyen, Spring/Summer 1990 campaign by Gian Paolo Barbieri, Spring/Summer 1991 by Gian Paolo Barbieri, Spring/Summer 1993 by Tyen, Spring/Summer 1993 ready-to-wear, Spring/Summer 1993 campaign by Gian Paolo Barbieri, via  Gianfranco Ferre: Lessons in Fashion

7 comments:

  1. I really enjoyed reading the last two posts and realised while reading them that I hardly knew anything about the designer. I loved the story of the bracelet and the Italian Vogue editor. What a defining moment!

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    1. Lisa, you know, although he has always been one designers I admired, I didn't know much about him either, so I had to learn on the spot. :) Glad you are enjoying the stories.

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  2. I could read your fashion stories for hours. :) I find it fascinating that he had an architecture background and this so obviously influenced his designer work. xo

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    1. I can say the same about your beautiful posts. :) He really was an amazing person - the more I learn about him, the more I appreciate his designs. x

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  3. I think it's a very interesting biography. First of all, I didn't know this man and his jewelry. I became interested on your post, because I read he was studying Architecture, something I would really like to study soon, and that he started doing jewelry just for fun, as a hobby. It's a think I would really like to do in my life: not to become only and Architect, so also spend my time doing other things related. So, I found your article very inspiring for me!

    Thank you soo much too for the comment on my blog!
    See you, kiss!

    Amanda
    http://somethingfashion.blogspot.com

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  4. Sheer gorgeousness. I love learning more about him, I was always such a fan of his overall style as a person. Happy weekend to you Natalia!

    p.s. I included you in today's links

    xo Mary Jo

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  5. I didn't know about Ferre's love for jewellery! There are so many interesting things that I discover on your blog...now I'm curious and I'm going to look for images of his jewellery pieces...Thanks Natalia!

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