Angel

30/01/2012

Amber Valletta in Angel | Harper’s Bazaar December 1993 (photography: Peter Lindbergh, styling: Paul Cavaco)
A beautiful collaboration between Peter Lindbergh and Amber Valletta for the December 1993 issue of Harper’s Bazaar that always, always makes me think about one of my favourite movies, a song, time spent with my best friend and time spent alone listening to that song on repeat. I think what I adore about editorials from the past is that so many of them weren’t just about clothes, but looked more like stories full of emotions.

Amber Valletta in Angel | Harper’s Bazaar December 1993 (photography: Peter Lindbergh, styling: Paul Cavaco)
Amber Valletta in Angel | Harper’s Bazaar December 1993 (photography: Peter Lindbergh, styling: Paul Cavaco)
Amber Valletta in Angel | Harper’s Bazaar December 1993 (photography: Peter Lindbergh, styling: Paul Cavaco)
Amber Valletta in Angel | Harper’s Bazaar December 1993 (photography: Peter Lindbergh, styling: Paul Cavaco)
Amber Valletta in Angel | Harper’s Bazaar December 1993 (photography: Peter Lindbergh, styling: Paul Cavaco)
Amber Valletta in Angel | Harper’s Bazaar December 1993 (photography: Peter Lindbergh, styling: Paul Cavaco)
Photo source: Amber Valletta in Angel | Harper’s Bazaar December 1993 (photography: Peter Lindbergh, styling: Paul Cavaco)

Gabrielle Caunesil

29/01/2012

Gabrielle Caunesil
She looks like one of Ingres’ paintings. Timeless and flawless French beauty I have just discovered on Elite’s website. What a stunning girl.

This works, really

27/01/2012

This Works No wrinkles extreme moisturiser
I heard of This Works a few years ago, but never got around to see their products, let alone try any. It changed a couple of months ago because I run out of my Korres Rose moisturiser. Off I went to purchase another portion only to see that it was out of stock. More over, I was told that it wasn’t suitable for my age and I needed something different because physical age is a physical age and one just has to get on with it. I did a quick research and ended up purchasing Materia Herba anti-aging moisturiser. I didn’t like that moisturiser at all. The packaging looked cheap and the feeling of the product on my skin was, how should I put it… well, it was strange, like a layer of sticky film without stickiness as you touch your face. It was my first disappointment. Next one came after I realised that some of Korres products do actually contain parabens and although this particular cream was ok, I didn’t feel comfortable any more. So I choose  not to continue using Korres skin care as wonderful as some products can be (I still adore and use the make-up range, though).

My next task was to find a product that
a) didn’t have parabens or mineral oils
b) was anti-aging
c) contained essential oils
d) was made in the UK or France

After selecting a few creams and thoroughly filtering the list, I finally choose No Wrinkles Extreme Moisturiser. Made by This Works, a UK-based company founded by Kathy Phillips who spent 7 years working at Vogue as a Health and Beauty Director, it was free from phthalates, sulphates, synthetic colours and fragrance, parabens, GMOs, mineral oils, petrolatum and propylene glycol.

It was also packed with some wonderful active ingredients including retinol known for its anti-aging properties, hydrating and collagen-boosting hyaluronic acid, and moringa and UK sourced organic crambe oil that provide a generous supply of essential fatty acids. Plus the magic potion contained amino-acids, shea  and cocoa butters, castor  and jojoba oil and, of course, essential oils.

Then there was the jar. I took my own picture of it because I believe what you see on-line doesn’t really do it any justice. It looks gorgeous and expensive, it’s heavy when you hold it and smooth as you touch the surface. It’s like a large ice-cube that holds a frozen scoop of ice-cream inside. Even my husband commented how beautiful that jar looked on a bathroom shelf.

The cream itself is a pure indulgence. I always think of my beauty routine as a ritual and having to use this moisturiser every morning and evening makes me feel spoilt, relaxed and happy. A little goes a long way. I pick a small quantity, apply it with the palms of my hands and after pressing it into my skin, follow with a quick massage while inhaling a wonderful light fragrance of bergamot oil with a touch of lemon and cedarwood as undertones.

This cream really works. I can’t comment on the anti-aging effects yet, but my skin always feels comfortable and never – dry, even in this strange winter environmental mix of radiators and cold winds.

It costs £45 for 48g and will most likely last a couple of months. 

***

As some people may be sensitive to essential oils, I’ve decided to list all the ingredients here as a health&safety part of my post.

No Wrinkles Extreme Moisturiser Ingredients: Aqua (water), butylene glycol, butyrospermum parkii (shea) butter, coconut alkanes, ricinus communis (castor) seed oil, glycerin, crambe abyssinica seed oil, moringa oleifera seed oil, glyceryl stearate SE, theobroma cacao (cocoa) butter, caprylic triglycerides, candelilla/jojoba/rice bran polyglyceryl-3 esters, glyceryl stearate, citrus aurantium bergamia (bergamot) peel oil, citrus limon (lemon) peel oil, cedrus atlantica (cedarwood) wood oil, citrus aurantium amara (petitgrain) oil, phenoxyethanol, cetearyl alcohol, sodium stearoyl lactylate, hydroxypropyl cyclodextrin, acrylates/C10-30 alkyl acrylate crosspolymer, coco-caprylate/caprate, xylitylglucosides, mannitol, arginine, serine, sucrose, hydrogenated castol oil, mica, parfume, anhydroxylitol, sodium hyaluronate, benzyl alcohol, limonene, PCA, citruline, glycogen, histidine HCl, cera alba (beeswax), xylitol, ethylhexyglycerin, rtinol, linalool, copernicia cerifera (carnauba) wax, alanine, threonie, glutamin acid, lysine HCl, dehydroacetic acid, sodium hydroxide, citral, geraniol, Cl 77891 (titanium dioxide).

Stylish quote

25/01/2012

Marie Claire Italia October 2004
"Elegance is not about being noticed, it's about being remembered."

Giorgio Armani

Photo source: Marie Claire Italia October 2004

Beautiful lies

24/01/2012

Beautiful Lise / Audrey Tautou movie review / via fashioned by love British fashion blog
Do you ever feel like you want to watch a movie that feels like a sunshine smile on

The Year of the Dragon

23/01/2012

Hwangini in Paris | Vogue Korea June 2007 (photography: Paolo Roversi)
The year of the Dragon is finally here and I thought I’d celebrate it with an exquisite editorial from Vogue Korea shot by Paolo Roversi and leave you a link to one of the astrology websites I’ve come across in case you’d like to look into the future.

Hwangini in Paris | Vogue Korea June 2007 (photography: Paolo Roversi)
Hwangini in Paris | Vogue Korea June 2007 (photography: Paolo Roversi)
Hwangini in Paris | Vogue Korea June 2007 (photography: Paolo Roversi)
Hwangini in Paris | Vogue Korea June 2007 (photography: Paolo Roversi)
Hwangini in Paris | Vogue Korea June 2007 (photography: Paolo Roversi)
Photo source: Hwangini in Paris | Vogue Korea June 2007 (photography: Paolo Roversi)

Love is…

20/01/2012

Tatler UK June 2010 (photography: Luis Monteiro)
"Love is not some kind of pie that one can cut into pieces, it's more like a balloon

Stylish quote

18/01/2012

Anja Rubik in Numero March 2006 (photography: Sofia Sanchez & Mauro Mongiello)
"Carelesness in dressing in a moral suicide."

Honorè de Balzac

Photo source: Anja Rubik in Numero March 2006 (photography: Sofia Sanchez & Mauro Mongiello)

It’s not the size that matters

17/01/2012

Helen Hodac, Helen Guillaume and Fabienne Lagoarde in Maigrir sans se pourrir la vie | Biba April 2006 (photography: Sabine Villiard, styling: Elizabetta Cavatorta)
Here we have it again. Yet another articles called “Plus Size Bodies, What Is Wrong With Them Anyway?”  talking about models as the biggest evil of them all appeared PLUS Model Magazine and this time I just had to respond.

The mag apparently claims that…

Twenty years ago the average fashion model weighed 8% less than the average woman. Today, she weighs 23% less.

Ten years ago plus-size models averaged between size 12 and 18. Today the need for size diversity within the plus-size modelling industry continues to be questioned. The majority of plus-size models on agency boards are between a size 6 and 14, while the customers continue to express their dissatisfaction.

Most runway models meet the Body Mass Index physical criteria for Anorexia.

50% of women wear a size 14 or larger, but most standard clothing outlets cater to sizes 14 or smaller.

If we continue to ignore and rely on others to decide what we want to see, change will never happen. We have to be vocal and proactive, patient and realistic.

They also add that “not everyone is meant to be skinny, our bodies are beautiful and we are not talking about health here because not every skinny person is healthy”.

As somebody who is equally passionate about nutrition, health, fashion and beauty, I couldn’t ignore it.

I wasn’t sure what would be the best way to comment on the article, so I thought I’d use the above statements and respond to every one of them. Hopefully it won’t be too confusing.

Twenty years ago the average fashion model weighed 8% less than the average woman. Today, she weighs 23% less.

Well, first of all, what country was used to obtain this stats? The States, Australia, Japan, Europe?

I vividly remember what women and models looked like 20 years ago and let me remind the younger audience that 20 years ago an average woman was, in fact, slimmer than now while the model standards have hardly changed. In addition to that, it’s important to remember that many models in the 1990s were at least 18 where as now they start at 16. If somebody compares an average woman (who is most likely to be in her 20s if not 30s) to an average model, it’s obvious that the weight difference will be higher.

Ten years ago plus-size models averaged between US size 12 and 18. Today the need for size diversity within the plus-size modelling industry continues to be questioned. The majority of plus-size models on agency boards are between a size 6 and 14, while the customers continue to express their dissatisfaction.

It is impossible to please everyone, but a woman who is comfortable in her own skin won’t go out there saying that certain images should never be used in magazines because they make her feel inadequate. Why? Because her life keeps her busy and happy. The sky is blue, the grass is green and models come in certain sizes. That’s life.

From a nutritional point of view, if somebody’s diet isn’t balanced or a person carries excess amount of fat, the hormonal and nervous system may not function the way they should, which may lead to depression and many forms of dissatisfaction. Nothing to do with the models. Quod erat demonstrandum.

Most runway models meet the Body Mass Index physical criteria for Anorexia.

First of all, BMI isn’t a reliable marker for establishing whether or not a person is healthy. It is a well-known fact that an athlete will have a higher BMI than a woman in her, say, 70s, simply because the athlete would have more muscles that weigh more, it doesn’t also establish whether or not a person is healthy.

Models are never chosen by weight – weight doesn’t matter as long as the vital stats meet the criteria, so I’m not even sure how somebody managed to measure their BMIs without obtaining the necessary information – or what it done just by looking at those girl?

If somebody does want to do any forms of calculations, they should use waist/hips ratio instead.
Using the term “anorexia” in combination with modelling industry is not a fair play. Anyone can become anorexic. It doesn’t come with the job, but rather caused by emotional imbalances of many kinds.

Yes, some models are very slim and may get into “underweight” category, however, it doesn’t necessarily mean that they are anorexics or unhealthy. More over, being slim may actually decrease risk of developing certain types of disease and increase life expectancy.

On the other hand, according to one of the recent surveys almost 70% of women are, in fact, overweight, which definitely increases their risk of heart disease and diabetes etc. Small percentage of these women do have hormonal imbalances that may cause weight gain, but they are a minority here. 

50% of women wear a US size 14 or larger, but most standard clothing outlets cater to sizes 14 or smaller.

Fair enough, but many companies cannot afford producing large size clothes that require more complicated patterns AND more fabric that would  have to be sold for the same price as a smaller size garment. Can’t really blame them for it.

If we continue to ignore and rely on others to decide what we want to see, change will never happen. We have to be vocal and proactive, patient and realistic.

You know what would be the most wonderful and proactive thing here? Tell women that being overweight has nothing to do with being beautiful or not, but most importantly – with her health and health of her children. This is the reality. The world is getting bigger and it’s got nothing, absolutely nothing to do with the models – they maintain what they’ve got while an average woman gains more and more as the years go by.

I’m very well aware that a successful model knows a lot about nutrition and healthy eating and her diet is balanced and clean. She also exercises or walks a lot and takes care of her body and mind. After all, modelling is a job that requires beautiful skin, slim body and ability to work under pressure that can only be achieved through healthy diet and lifestyle. And talking of jobs… Ballerinas are also required to be very slim, just slim as models… Why the society is happy to accept them as a norm, but criticising the models for every bump and lump?

I feel that by writing such an article the PLUS magazine is not actually trying to help women, but rather creating yet another hype and using models as the most obvious subject because they are a minority here. Good marketing move, of course, but do the mag editors really believe they did something to improve self-esteem or life of plus-size women out there? Perhaps, it’s best to stop creating an unnecessary revolution and start writing articles that would actually provide useful information to PLUS mag readers? Say, delicious recipes for a balanced diet, dressing for your body shape, or what those 2 extra inches around the waist really do for one’s health? Just a though, you know…

I’d be very interested to hear your thoughts on the subject, whatever they are. Do you think the article does have a point? Feel free to express your ideas and emotions here.

Photo source: Helen Hodac, Helen Guillaume and Fabienne Lagoarde in Maigrir sans se pourrir la vie | Biba April 2006 (photography: Sabine Villiard, styling: Elizabetta Cavatorta)

Show and tell

16/01/2012

Ana Beatriz Barros in Show & tell |  Elle US January 2002 (photography: Gilles Bensimon)
Love this editorial from Elle US featuring Ana Beatriz Barros. It looks as if every image is going to dissolve in the light. So here is something delicate for a beautiful Monday.

Ana Beatriz Barros in Show & tell |  Elle US January 2002 (photography: Gilles Bensimon)
Ana Beatriz Barros in Show & tell |  Elle US January 2002 (photography: Gilles Bensimon)
Ana Beatriz Barros in Show & tell |  Elle US January 2002 (photography: Gilles Bensimon)
Ana Beatriz Barros in Show & tell |  Elle US January 2002 (photography: Gilles Bensimon)
Photo source: Ana Beatriz Barros in Show & tell |  Elle US January 2002 (photography: Gilles Bensimon)

Perfect hair etc.

15/01/2012

How to create reverse bun hair tutorial / Elle Argentina December 2011 / fashioned by love
Ok, first things first – I finally got myself to pinterest. I know, I’m probably the last one in

Shopping list 2012

12/01/2012

Marie Claire Russia April 2011
I like making lists for everything including my wardrobe. The list keeps me focused

Stylish quote

11/01/2012

Edita Vilkeviciute in Vogue Germany July 2008 (photography: Thomas Schenk, styling: Nicola Knels & Lynn Schmidt)
"It is not very wise to buy a red dress. But I can understand the temptation simply because men will say: "Who is that girl in the red dress?"

Marlene Dietrich

Photo source: Edita Vilkeviciute in Vogue Germany July 2008 (photography: Thomas Schenk, styling: Nicola Knels & Lynn Schmidt)

Stormy

06/01/2012

Stylish quote

04/01/2012

Jessica Stam in Vogue UK November 2010 (photography: Lina Scheynius, styling: Bay Garnett)
"You can be the most beautiful girl in the world, but if there's nothing going on underneath, it doesn't last very long."

Louie Chaban

Photo source: Jessica Stam in Vogue UK November 2010 (photography: Lina Scheynius, styling: Bay Garnett)

Healthy inspiration

03/01/2012

Biba France February 2011
i-D magazine is like a cool friend who wears Isabel Marant and Zadig & Voltaire and has a very fresh attitude towards fashion and life in general. I bought the winter issue because I loved the cover and realised that, unlike in a typical fashion mag, there were quite a few articles suitable for reading and digesting rather than just swallowing like a sugar-overloaded ice-cream.

Most importantly, the entire issue was dedicated to health and that vital holistic the body + the mind connection. And let me tell you that the result was beyond beautiful and inspirational!

Here’s a (long) quote from i-D’s “The greatest wealth is health” article that I would like to share with you. Absorb it with every cell of your body and make it your new year motto because, after all, nothing is more beautiful than you and the way you feel inside.

“Health is eight hours of sleep. Health is jumping out of bed. Health is the sun in the sky. Health is five-a-day. Health is nuts, seeds and pulses. Health is a smoothie, Health is a brisk stroll. Health is a gentle jog. Health is touching the sky. Health is touching your toes. Health is spreading your wings. Health is not worrying about health. Health is eight glasses of water a day. Health is feeling good about yourself frim the inside out. Health is shiny skin and glossy hair. Health is dark chocolate. Health is a glass of red wine with your meal. Health is a little of what you fancy does you good. Health is fresh air. Health is climbing the tree. Health is not climbing the walls. Health is a spring in your step. Health is laughing out loud. Health is singing at the top of your lungs. Health is a natural high. Health is good friends and family. Health is a state of mind. Health is not a luxury. Health is a human right. Health is global. Health is social. Health is a lottery. Health is an investment for the future. Health is private. health is happiness. Health is what you make of it.”

Photo source: Biba France February 2011

It happened one night

02/01/2012